Returning Home in Soyuz – a Wild, Wild Ride

A second edition of the book ‘The Farthest Shore: A 21st Century Guide to Space’ has just been published by Apogee Books (a Canadian publisher). http://www.cgpublishing.com/ The original book was a paperback that served as a textbook for the students of International Space University. It covered all aspects of space exploration and development. The new […]

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Let’s regain our place as a nation of explorers

I noticed a tweet this morning from my space colleague Natalie Panek stating that the federal government’s Standing Committee on Finance had launched its pre-budget consultations and deliberations in advance of the 2019 federal budget. Natalie encouraged us to make our voices heard by sharing our priorities with the Committee. I was eager to help. […]

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International Space University’s Space Studies Program: a path to a career in space

Congratulations to Maliyat and TJ for determining that I was in Cork, Ireland earlier this month to participate in International Space University (ISU)’s Space Studies Program (SSP). I’ll put signed photos in the mail for both of you. My visit to Cork was brief but I did have the opportunity to deliver a lecture, adjudicate […]

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UCalgary engineer assesses bone strength in astronauts

I was at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston earlier this month for my annual medical exam. This exam is part of the Longitudinal Study on Astronaut Health, an occupational surveillance program for former astronauts (see my earlier blog about this proactive medical surveillance program.) In addition to the usual physical exam and laboratory […]

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The trajectory to professional and personal success is not always straight and smooth

Last Friday afternoon, three of my colleagues launched from Kazakhstan aboard a Soyuz rocket to the International Space Station. The launch was successful and their capsule rendezvoused and docked to the Station in the late evening. Amongst the crew was cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of the Russian Space Agency. This was Alexey’s first spaceflight following several […]

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Congratulations to UCalgary’s space weather researchers

I was delighted to read UCalgary’s announcement about new funding for space research. As part of the Canadian Space Agency’s Geospace Observatory Canada initiative, $1.4M has been granted to three universities, including the University of Calgary, for research into space weather. Weather in space! Who knew?  There are, of course, no visible clouds or blizzards in […]

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A week in Australia with SH-SSP students

I am in Adelaide, Australia this week participating in International Space University’s  ‘Southern Hemisphere Space Studies Program’ (quite a mouthful!). SH-SSP is a fast-paced, five-week academic experience for senior undergraduates, grad students and young professionals from southern hemisphere nations. The Program curriculum covers the multidisciplinary aspects of space exploration and development. This year’s participants include […]

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neuroArm: an example of space technologies benefiting people on Earth

Steve Allan is one of my colleagues on the University of Calgary’s Board of Governors. In his outside life, Steve is a chartered accountant with a distinguished career in the Canadian tourism industry. He also has an admirable spirit of volunteerism that includes service with the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede and the Rotary Club of […]

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Why does depth perception change during spaceflight? I’ve got answers!

In my April 13 blog entry I wrote about an experiment known as Reversible Figures that was performed by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. I also asked your thoughts on how depth perception might change during spaceflight. The results of this experiment have recently been published so I am now at liberty to provide the […]

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